株式会社リンググローバルソリューション

グループサイト

文字サイズ

  • 小
  • 中
  • 大
  • お問い合わせ
  • TEL:03-6779-9420
  • JAPANESE
  • ENGLISH

COLUMN コラム

Global Business Skills

2016.10.18

The Importance of the Three Pillars and English Skills【Part1】

ロバート・ヒルキ

In my previous article, I talked about the three pillars necessary for a global businessperson in today’s diverse business environment. Of course, being able to communicate comfortably in English is one of these three pillars. (The other two are business skills and intercultural communication skills.) And while the vast majority of Japanese businesspeople today are either ambivalent or openly hostile towards English, there is no escaping the fact that these same people recognize that they need English in their future careers. According to our latest data taken from Japanese business people in our seminars, 73.8% are either ambivalent or hostile towards English. At the same time, 94.3% say that English is (to some extent, or very) necessary for themselves and their companies.

As you can see from these data, there is a huge shift in opinions. People don’t like English, but they know that they need it. But that in itself is understandable. And it is not the fault of the seminar participants. It is the fault of the Japanese English-language education system at the time which did not help to prepare them for successfully navigating the global business world they would face as members of society in situations where they would need to use English. So it’s not surprising that many people have a kind of English allergy.

But if it were only English, Japanese companies could go to my home state of California to find Japanese kikokushijo (Japanese returning from studying abroad). They undoubtedly have excellent English, but do they have commensurate business skills to support their control of the language? Maybe some people do. And some people don’t. Simply being able to speak English is no guarantee of success in today’s global business environment. Let me relate a sad story. A few months back, we were facilitating a global meeting for a large Japanese corporation at its headquarters in Tokyo. There were meeting participants from all over the world. One of the presenters was a Japanese who had almost native control of English. (I found out later that her TOEIC score was 975 – a perfect score is 990.) Yet, her presentation was painful to watch. She had very dense PowerPoint slides, made no eye contact with the audience, used her laser pointer like the bouncing ball in a Showa-era karaoke song, and simply read the information off the screen. Many of the audience members, especially those from Europe and North America, were so frustrated with her presentation that they eventually gave up listening to her and started checking their emails on their smartphones. Just being able to speak English fluently is not enough, then. Business skills, from making effective presentations to negotiating million-dollar contracts, are also clearly necessary.

But even if you achieve the maximum TOEIC score and have a first-class technology certification (技能検定一級), if you can’t read other people’s ways of thinking, you won’t really be able to display your full ability in a global business environment. That’s why the shared commonality for the three pillars is the real target, i.e., the person who has the language ability (English, and if stationed abroad, also the local language), who has the business skill, and who also has the intercultural awareness to be able to navigate this global environment successfully.

What I have just described above represents the core philosophy of LGS. We give our participants a set of practical tools that they can use to identify any gaps in joushiki between themselves and their business partners and then to take action to close those gaps. Of course, we need some frameworks, or measuring tools, to identify and measure/quantify these gaps so that we can take steps to close the gaps. We call these frameworks “Maps.” Our program director, Gaz Monteath, has written an entire series about the LGS Maps and their relevance in global business. Please contact us if you are interested in reading them.

2016.10.18

三本の柱と英語力の重要性【パート1】

ロバート・ヒルキ

前回のコラムでは、今日のグローバルなビジネス環境におけるグローバルなビジネスパーソンに必要な三本の柱についてお話しました。もちろん、英語で快適にコミュニケーションが取れることはその三本の柱のうちのひとつです。(残りの二つは、ビジネススキルと異文化コミュニケーションスキルです。)
日本人ビジネスパーソンの圧倒的多数は、英語に対してどっちつかずな感情か、あからさまに敵意を持っている一方で、将来のキャリアにおける英語の必要性を認識しているのもこの同じ人々であるというのも逃れようのない事実なのです。
私たちのセミナーを受講された日本人ビジネスパーソンの方々から得られた最新のデータによると、73.8%の方が英語に対して曖昧な感情か敵意を抱いています。同時に、94.3%の方がご自分や会社にとって英語が(ある程度、または非常に)必要だと言っています。

これらのデータに見られるように、気持ちに大きな矛盾があります。
皆さん、英語は好きではありませんが、必要だということはわかっているのです。このこと自体は理解できます。そして、これはセミナーに参加された方々が悪いのではないのです。悪いのは日本の英語教育制度であり、そのために彼らは、将来英語を使わなくてはならない状況にある社会の一員として直面するであろうグローバルなビジネスワールドを無事に渡ってゆく準備ができていないのです。
よって、多くの方がある種の英語アレルギーを持っていることは意外ではありません。

しかし、もし問題が英語だけであったなら、日本企業は私の故郷であるカリフォルニア州で日本人の(海外で就学後日本に帰国する)帰国子女を見つければよいのです。彼らの英語力は疑いようもなく素晴らしいですが、その語学力の助けとなる同等のビジネススキルは持っているでしょうか。持っている方もいれば持っていない方もいます。
単に英語を話せるだけでは今日のグローバルなビジネス環境での成功は保証されません。

悲しいエピソードをご紹介しましょう。
数か月前、私たちは大手日本企業の東京本社でグローバルな会議を進めていました。会議には世界中からの参加者がいました。講演者の一人に、ほぼネイティブレベルの英語を話す日本人がいらっしゃいました。(後でわかったのですが、彼女はTOEIC試験で975点を獲得していました(満点は990点です)。)
それでも、彼女のプレゼンテーションは痛々しいものでした。彼女のパワーポイントのスライドにはぎっしり情報が詰まっており、彼女は参加者らと目を合わせる訳でもなく、レーザーポインターを昭和のカラオケソングのようにバウンドさせながら、画面の情報を読んでいただけでした。参加者の多く、特にヨーロッパや北米から参加していた人たちは彼女のプレゼンテーションに苛立ち、最終的には聴くのをあきらめ、スマートフォンでメールをチェックし始めました。
英語を流ちょうに話せるだけでは十分ではないのです。効果的なプレゼンテーションから億単位の契約交渉までをこなすことができるビジネススキルも、明らかに必要なのです。

しかし、TOEIC試験で最高点を取得し、技能検定一級を持っていても、他者の考え方を読めなければ、グローバルなビジネス環境において本当の意味で自分の能力をフルに発揮できません。そのため、三本の柱をすべて持っていることが本当の目標なのです。
つまり、語学力(英語、そして海外に駐在の場合はその現地の言語)、ビジネススキル、そしてこのグローバル環境を上手に渡っていくための異文化意識の3つです。

今ここでご説明したことはリンクグローバルソリューションの中核となる理念です。私たちは、セミナーに参加された方々に実践ツールを一式提供しており、自分たちと業務提携先との間の常識のギャップを特定したり、それらのギャップを埋める措置を講じたりするためにご使用いただいています。もちろん、これらのギャップを特定したり、測定あるいは定量化したりするためには何らかの枠組みや測定ツールが必要で、だからこそギャップを埋める対応ができるのです。私たちはこれらの枠組みを「マップ」と呼んでいます。私たちのプログラム・ディレクターであるガズ・モンティースがリンクグローバルソリューションのマップと、グローバルビジネスにおけるその関連性についてシリーズで書いたものがございます。お読みになりたい方は弊社までご連絡ください。

ロバート・ヒルキ

Robert Hilke

PROFILE
カリフォルニア大学サンディエゴ校卒、言語学/TESOL修士課程修了。日本在住歴は40年近い。来日後は国際基督教大学(ICU)専任講師を16年間にわたり務める。また早稲田大学でも非常勤講師として教鞭をとる。2000年からはLGSにてファシリテーション、ティーチング、コンサルティングに従事。TOEIC、TOEFLのカリスマであり、100冊近くの参考書を上梓、テスト攻略講座の講師としても活躍。

このコラムニストの記事一覧に戻る

コラムトップに戻る