株式会社リンググローバルソリューション

グループサイト

文字サイズ

  • 小
  • 中
  • 大
  • お問い合わせ
  • TEL:03-6779-9420
  • JAPANESE
  • ENGLISH

COLUMN コラム

Assertion and Assumptions

2016.11.15

Harmony Rules

グレアム・レンズ

Cultures are changing all the time and these changes are happening more quickly than ever as the world globalizes. However, even with such changes, clear differences in core values are still very evident. In the United States, for example, the culture tends to value assertive individuals and reward those who stand out from the pack. The opposite situation can typically be seen in Japan, where there is a strong tendency to value harmony within groups over individuality.

The well known proverb, The nail that stands out gets hammered down, is a good example of how the culture supports this bias towards group harmony. It is very easy to imagine one nail, or stake, standing higher than the others and being beaten down with a large hammer to the same level as those around it. It is important to recognize that this is typically the collective influence of Japanese culture as a whole.

Japanese society’s emphasis on harmony has been expressed in collectivism and conformism for more than a thousand years. In the early 7th century in Japan, harmony was actually codified as a value by Prince Shotoku in the country’s first constitution. The document was largely influenced by Buddhist and Confucian thought, and it focused on the morals and virtues to be displayed by society. Three of the seventeen articles, paraphrased below, show the importance of harmony that is still very much alive in modern day Japan.

1. Harmony is valued, and the avoidance of opposition is honored
Harmonious behavior creates an environment in which open opposition is avoided. This allows members of society to save face. In a business meeting, strongly challenging someone in front of others would be a breach of that harmony, and so this behavior is not commonly seen. Harmony does not mean that people in Japan do not have opposing views. It means that the way of expressing those opposing views, if expressed at all, tends to be very indirect compared with cultures that value assertiveness.

In a negotiation or conflict situation, it is very common for Japanese to use a neutral third party to help avoid directly criticizing someone. Involving a third party allows both sides to clearly express their views, while also avoiding any open opposition. The third party can then choose softer or more indirect words when communicating the message to further ensure that loss of face will not occur for either of the parties. This less assertive approach allows people to maintain harmony.

2. To turn away from what is private, and towards what is public
Inside a typical Japanese corporation, the line between work life and private life has historically been faintly drawn. While many salaried employees would like to have a healthier work-life balance, the demands of the company are highly prioritized in their lives. Unless it is a day that the company has decided will have no overtime, employees regularly work after hours. On this so-called “no zangyou day,” all employees leave the company at the end of the fixed workday. Not by coincidence, this is also the day of the week that employees tend to participate in work related after-hours social events with coworkers or customers.

Inside the company, individual career advancement has typically been connected more to the number of years served and less to actual performance. Individual performance is measured, but when deciding bonuses, the measurement is made in relative terms rather than absolute terms. This means the resulting gap in bonus sizes between employees is actually very small. While this does not promote assertiveness, it makes sense in the typical Japanese corporation where the focus is on the success of the team as a whole, rather than that of the individual members of the team. The actual output or achievement is often a small part of the evaluation compared with attitude, effort, teamwork, and use of trusted processes.

3. Decisions should not be made by one person alone
Decision-making is rarely done on an individual basis. Although Japan can look like a top-down culture from the outside, those inside it know that if managers want their decision to be supported, they must speak with various layers of people that will be affected. Thus, ideas are slowly advanced through a department or a company through a process of nemawashi.

Nemawashi is a way to test ideas with individuals before presenting them in to a group in a meeting. This very common process allows employees to voice their ideas and get individual feedback from various stakeholders. Ideas can be improved and support can be gained in this process, or ideas can be scrapped altogether depending on feedback. While this approach appears far less assertive than just stating ideas directly in a meeting, it avoids surprises and promotes quicker adoption of ideas with the harmonious support of all involved.

Culture has evolved as a way of successfully interacting with others in society. In a sense it is a learned survival skill for a given environment that dictates a range of acceptable behaviors. From the viewpoint of more assertive cultures, Japanese behavior is often seen as inappropriately passive. At the same time, from the standpoint of a culture that is focused on promoting harmony among its members, assertive behavior feels aggressive. While assertive members may sometimes experience success in Japan, they will more likely be brought back into line by the collective influence of the surrounding culture wielding the hammer of harmony.

2016.11.15

和のルール

グレアム・レンズ

文化は常に変化しており、その変化の速度は世界のグローバル化に伴い、よりスピーディーになりつつあります。しかし、これらの変化にもかかわらず、基本的価値観の明確な違いはいまだに歴然と存在しています。
例えば、米国では自己主張の強い個人が評価され、集団から傑出する人が報酬を得る傾向があります。反対の状況が日本では一般的に見られます。個人よりも集団の中での和を重んじる傾向が強いからです。

よく知られたことわざ、「出る杭は打たれる」は、集団の和に対するこのバイアスを文化がいかに下支えするかを示すよい例です。
他よりも高く出ている1本の釘または杭が大きな金づちで周りと同じ高さまで打ち込まれるところは、非常に想像しやすいものです。
これは日本文化全体の典型的な共通の影響であるという認識が重要です。

日本社会は千年以上の間、集団主義や体制順応主義に示されるように、和に重点を置いてきました。
事実、7世紀初めの日本では、和は聖徳太子により価値として国の最初の憲法に成文化されました。同文書は仏教と儒教の考えに大きく影響を受けており、社会が示すモラルや美徳に重点を置いていました。
17条あるうちの3つを下記にわかりやすく言い換え、現代日本にいまだ大いに健在である和の重要性についてお話したいと思います。

1.和を大切なものとし、いさかいを起こさないことを尊ぶ

和を尊ぶ行動は、公然と反対することを避ける環境を生み出します。これにより社会の中ではお互いの対面が保たれます。
ビジネスミーティングでは、他の人の前で誰かに強く異論を唱えると和を乱すことになるため、このような行動は一般的にはあまり見られません。かと言って、日本人が反対意見を持っていないということではありません。その表現方法が異なるのです。
仮に反対意見を示す事になった場合、それは自己主張を重んじる文化と比べると非常に間接的なものになる傾向があります。

交渉や対立の状況下で、日本人が中立の第三者を使い、誰かを直接非難するのを避けようとすることがよく見られます。第三者を関与させることで、両者がそれぞれの見解を明確に表明でき、一方で公然とした対立を避けることもできます。第三者は意図を伝える際に、より柔らかで間接的な言葉を選ぶことができるため、さらに確実に両者のメンツが保たれるという訳です。
この非主張型アプローチにより人々は和を保つことができるのです。

2.私心を捨てて公務にあたること

典型的な日本企業では、仕事とプライベートとの境界は歴史的にもあいまいにされてきました。
多くの会社員はより健康的なワーク・ライフ・バランスを求めているのでしょうが、会社の要求が彼らの生活では高く優先されているのです。会社規定の残業なしの日でない限り、従業員は残業をするのが普通です。「ノー残業デー」と呼ばれるこの日は、すべての従業員が定時で退社します。週のうちのこの日に限って、従業員が同僚やお客様と就業後の仕事関連の社交行事に参加することが多いのは偶然ではありません。

社内では、個人のキャリアアップは本人の実績よりも主として勤続年数に、より強く結びついてきました。
個人の成績は評価されますが、賞与を決める際にはその評価は絶対的というよりはむしろ相対的に考慮されます。つまり、従業員間における賞与額の差は実際には非常に小さくなるのです。
これは自己主張を促進しませんが、チーム全体としての成功をチーム内の個人の成功よりも重視する典型的な日本企業ではうなずけることです。態度や努力、チームワーク、そして信頼されたプロセスを活用しているかどうかに比べると、実際の生産性や成果は、評価の中では小さな部分を占めるにすぎないのです。

3.ものごとはひとりで判断するべきではない

意思決定が個人ベースでなされることはほとんどありません。外側からは日本はトップダウンの文化のように見えますが、内側にいる人にとっては、マネージャーが自分の意見の支持を得たいならば、さまざまな階層の関係者と話をしなければならないことは周知の事実です。こうして、アイデアは「根回し」のプロセスを通して部署や会社内で徐々に進められていきます。

「根回し」は、会議で集団にアイデアを提示する前に、個人に対しそのアイデアを試してみるやり方です。このとても一般的なプロセスにより、従業員は自分のアイデアを言葉にでき、様々な利害関係者から個人的なフィードバックを得られます。
このプロセスにおいて、アイデアを改善したり支持を得たりすることが可能ですが、そうでなければフィードバック次第でアイデアを却下することもあり得ます。このアプローチは、単に会議で直接アイデアを述べることに比べるとかなり非主張的のように見えますが、意外性を回避し、すべての関係者の調和のとれた支持を持って、より迅速なアイデアの採用を促します。

文化は、社会における他者との上手な交流の方法として発展してきました。
ある意味、それは許容行動範囲を決定づける与えられた環境の中で、人々が生き残るために学んだスキルなのです。
より主張型の文化の観点からすると、日本人の行動はしばしば不適切に受動的だと見られます。同時に、集団の中の和を奨励することに重きを置いた文化の見地からは、自己主張の強い行動は強引に感じられます。

主張型の人は日本で時に成功するかもしれませんが、一方で、和の金づちを振るう周囲の文化の集団的影響により、高い確率で元の場所に引き戻されてしまうのです。
グレアム・レンズ

グレアム・レンズ

Graham Lenz

PROFILE
ブリティッシュ・コロンビア大学でビジネス、マーケティングを専攻し卒業(1994年)。異文化コミュニケーションの修了証取得(2012年)。上記学位取得中には、バンクーバーのブリティッシュ・コロンビア電話会社でもビジネス経験を積んだ。1994年に来日し、ブリタニカ・ジャパン大阪支社でブランチマネジャーを6年間務める。その後、大阪体育大学で6年間に渡って英語を指導する傍ら、カナダへの日本人旅行者向けに消費税還付ビジネスを行う。2006年には国際ビジネス・コミュニケーションを専門に企業コンサルティングを行うクリエイト社に入社。2012年LGSに入社。

このコラムニストの記事一覧に戻る

コラムトップに戻る