株式会社リンググローバルソリューション

グループサイト

文字サイズ

  • 小
  • 中
  • 大
  • お問い合わせ・資料請求
  • TEL:03-6779-9420
  • JAPANESE
  • ENGLISH

COLUMN コラム

Globalizing Japan

2016.10.11

The Seven Habits of Highly Effective Japanese Global Companies

ジョナサン・リンチ

Inspired by the title of the influential Seven Habits of Highly Effective People bestseller by Dr. Stephen Covey, I will look at the underlying mindset and behaviors necessary for the successful globalization of Japanese companies in the most significant areas, as expressed by seven key business “habits.” My definition of “globalization” here does not mean merely copying existing global standards, but rather effectively adjusting Japanese organizations’ systems and practices to engage with global counterparts and markets to the minimum extent necessary to maximize their global business success.

I should point out that these seven habits do not necessarily relate to the principles of Covey’s book, or precisely match academic research. Rather, they summarize my practical experience of more than twenty-five years of intercultural business training and consulting in Japan. While supporting Japanese business people in their struggles to follow domestic with international success across intercultural barriers, we noticed that some barriers were very obvious, while others were unseen. In many cases, even when there was strong realization of the need to change, and even understanding how to go about changing, actually changing the organization and its many employees’ habits was a considerable challenge.

Therefore, in this series of articles, I talk not only about what “global” should look like in Japanese companies, but also what are the keys to making necessary changes happen in reality. For example, employees may be at different stages in their overall journey towards globalization:

Stage 1: Unaware of global pressure, and not recognizing any need, urgency, or benefits related to change
Stage 2: Aware of why change is needed, but not sure of the type of change
Stage 3: Aware of the whys and hows related to change, but lacking the motivation, power, or skills to act on this awareness

I would like to create stage 4 for you here: successfully sharing a version of the Japanese organization’s business culture (its most successful management and working style elements) to which non-Japanese employees and stakeholders can effectively contribute.

My colleagues and I attempt to support all these stages by suggesting benefits, insights, and best practices to globalize Japanese corporations’ systems, leaders, and employees. Changes may be cascaded quickly from the top down to the bottom, but bottom-up change may also need to be executed, especially in conservative organizations.

Japan’s large, and perhaps unwieldy, traditional large corporations seem particularly resistant to fast change. It can seem to a cynical observer as though each wave of incumbent leaders is unwilling to take risks that might deliver failures on their watch. These people may seem to be endlessly deferring necessary future painful changes until after their retirement. In such cases, bottom-up changes can most be effectively delivered in an agile manner, as a series of small wins moving the organization in the right direction and reinforcing motivation and confidence to become more global.

Another key consideration is that all Japanese organizations are different from each other, and each Japanese employee also may have considerable diversity, based on age, gender, experiences, and character. For example, Japanese organizations with founder CEOs may tend to move more quickly and practice top-down management, while those with hired CEOs tend to be more conservative with group-oriented decision-making. However, there are still tendencies we can see at the organizational level in both types which are significantly different from those of their global rivals. In comparison with Western peers, these often include an emphasis on unspoken understanding, team-based working style, Confucian style discussions, and situational-related formality. Similarly, even though American or Northern European companies may have different values or decision making styles, in general, they are likely to prefer an apparently friendlier, clearer, and more verbally persuasive communication style and systems based on individual accountability.

Finally, even though some may have achieved top global market share and profitability, we are perhaps unlikely to see any fully successfully globalized Japanese companies. Rather, globalization is an ongoing journey for each organization as they integrate their head office culture with local overseas office cultures. They may be succeeding in some, but perhaps not all, areas.

Each organization may have its own specific best path for globalization depending on its unique history, working style, industries, production locations, key markets and trends. We believe that even the top global Japanese organizations would be significantly more successful if they could overcome all of their cultural barriers in the optimum way. The articles in this series, then, will attempt to explain the principles and mindset required to help each Japanese organization find its own optimum path for globalization. The recommendations will be based on the seven habits listed below.

1. Aim to Be ‘Glocal’ Market Leaders
Provide the right products and services in each major market in an effectively customized way that maximizes demand and profit
2. Communicate Clearly and Positively
Promote inclusive information and sharing of ideas so that everyone can contribute to his or her full potential
3. Innovate from Everywhere
Ensure full contributions by every region, department, and partner to innovation and future direction
4. Embrace Diversity: Lead Inclusively and Engagingly
Ensure that the best workers are rewarded and promoted, regardless of diversity factors, and that all employees want to take responsibility, and feel that they have influence and a voice that is heard
5. Manage Strategically, Clearly, and Transparently
Ensure that the management system and working style are both clear and transparent
6. Motivate All Staff to Reach Their Full Potential
Find ways to maximize motivation, engagement, and productivity
7. Embrace Calculated Risk-taking and Change at a Global Speed
Encourage a risk-taking, fast-moving business culture

2016.10.11

効果的な日本のグローバル企業の7つの習慣

ジョナサン・リンチ

私は、大きな影響力を持つスティーブン・R・コヴィー博士のベストセラー『7つの習慣(Seven Habits of Highly Effective People)』にヒントを得て、日本企業が最も重要な分野でグローバル化を進めるために必要とされる基本的な考え方と行動の仕方について考えていきたいと思います。これを、「7つの重要なビジネス習慣」と呼ぶことにしましょう。ここで取り上げる「グローバル化」とは、既存のグローバル化の単なる模倣ではなく、日本企業が海外企業との取引や海外市場への進出に向けてシステムや商慣行を効果的に微調整し、グローバルビジネスの成功を最大化することを意味します。

まず、これら7つの習慣は、コヴィー博士の著書にある原則とは必ずしも関連しておらず、学術的な調査とも正確には一致しないことをお断りしておかなくてはなりません。これらは、私の日本における25年以上の異文化ビジネストレーニングおよびコンサルティングの実体験から得たことをまとめたものです。私たちは、日本のビジネスパーソンが国内での成功に続き、異文化障壁を克服して国際的な成功を収めるための取り組みを支援してきました。そしてその過程で、非常に明確な障壁がある一方で、見えにくい障壁もあることに気づきました。変化の必要性が具体的に認識され、どうすれば変化を起こせるかを理解していても、組織を変えること、そして多くの従業員の習慣を実際に変えることは、たいていは非常に困難です。

この連載では、日本企業における「グローバル」のあるべき姿を語るだけでなく、実際に必要な変革を実行するための秘訣を取り上げていきます。例えば従業員のグローバル化には、以下のような段階があるかもしれません。

ステージ1:グローバルな圧力に気づかず、変化の必要性、緊急性、メリットを認識していない
ステージ2:変化が必要な理由に気づいているが、どのような変化が必要なのか、よく分かっていない
ステージ3:変化が必要な理由と、変化を起こす方法を知っているが、その気づきに基づいて行動するための動機、パワー、スキルが欠落している

これに加えて、読者の皆様のために「ステージ4」を設置しました。「日本企業において、日本人以外の従業員およびステークホルダーが効果的に貢献できるようなビジネス文化の1バージョン(その企業の最も成功した経営方式および労働形態の要素)を共有できている」のがステージ4です。

私たちは、日本企業におけるシステム、リーダーおよび従業員のグローバル化によるメリットと、実現のためのインサイトおよびベストプラクティスを提案することにより、これら全ての段階をサポートしようと試みています。トップダウンで速やかな変革を実現していくことも可能ですが、特に保守的な組織では、ボトムアップで変えていく必要があるかもしれません。

従来型の日本の大企業は、規模の大きさが災いするのか、速やかな変革に対して特に強い抵抗があります。意地の悪い見方をすれば、歴代のリーダーたちが自身の就任中に失敗が顕在化するようなリスクを取ることを嫌がるからかもしれません。また、将来的な痛みを伴うような変革が必要であるにもかかわらず、リーダーたちが自分の引退までそれを際限なく先延ばししているようにも見えます。こうした場合は、機動力を発揮してボトムアップの変革を実行することが、最も効果的かもしれません。組織を正しい方向に動かし、グローバル化への動機と信念を強めるという小さな達成を積み重ねていくやり方です。

もう一つの留意すべき重要な点は、全ての日本企業はそれぞれ異なっており、日本人従業員であっても年齢、性別、体験、性格にかなりの多様性があるということです。例えば、創業者がCEOを務める日本企業では迅速な行動とトップダウン経営が行われますが、雇われCEOが率いる組織はより保守的であり、集団重視の意思決定が行われる傾向があります。しかしどちらのタイプであっても、組織レベルの傾向については今も世界との間に大きな隔たりがあります。西欧の企業と比べると、日本企業には暗黙の利益、チーム重視の労働形態、儒教的なディスカッション、状況に基づく形式主義などの傾向が見られるのです。米国や北ヨーロッパの企業も、それぞれ独自の価値や意思決定のスタイルを持っているのは確かですが、全体としては、個々の説明責任に基づいて親切に、分かりやすく、言葉で説得するというコミュニケーションスタイルやシステムを好む傾向があるようです。

結局のところ、日本には世界市場でトップクラスのシェアや利益率を誇る企業はあっても、完全にグローバル化された企業はないように思われます。むしろグローバル化とは、それぞれの企業が本社の企業文化を現地の企業文化に統合する継続的な取り組みだと言えるでしょう。こうした統合が成功する地域もありますが、全ての地域でうまくいくとは限りません。

グローバル化の具体的な道筋は、それぞれの組織の歴史、労働形態、業種、生産地域、主要市場、傾向によって異なります。グローバルに活躍する日本のトップ企業が、最善の方法で全ての文化的障壁を克服できれば、その成功を大きく拡大できるはずです。この連載では、日本企業のそれぞれが自身に最も適したグローバル化の手法を見つけられるよう、必要な原則と考え方を説明していきます。「7つの習慣」に基づく提案は以下の通りです。

1. 「グローカル」な市場リーダーを目指す
需要と利益を最大化するよう効果的にカスタマイズした手法を使い、主要市場ごとに適切な製品とサービスを提供する
2. 明確かつ前向きなコミュニケーションを行う
情報共有を奨励し、誰もが潜在能力を十分に発揮して貢献できるようにする
3. あらゆる場からイノベーションを進める
全ての地域、部門、パートナーがイノベーションと将来の方向性に最大限に貢献できるようにする
4. 多様性を受け入れる:リーダーが多様性を受け入れ、従業員に積極的に関与する
持っている多様性にかかわらず、最も優れた従業員が報酬と昇進を得られるようにする。また、全ての従業員が責任を負うことを希望し、自分が影響力を持っていると感じ、意見を聞いてもらえると感じられるような環境を作る
5. 戦略的、明確かつ透明性の高い経営を行う
経営システムと労働形態の両方を明確にし、透明性を持たせる
6. 全てのスタッフが潜在能力を十分に発揮できるよう動機づけを行う
意欲、関与、生産性を最大化する方法を見つける
7. 計算されたリスクを受け入れ、グローバルなスピードで変える
リスクを受け入れ、迅速に行動する企業文化を奨励する

ジョナサン・リンチ

ジョナサン・リンチ

Jonathan Lynch

PROFILE
イギリスのブリストル大学で英文学と哲学を専攻。卒業後、1990年に来日。1991年にインテック・ジャパン(現LGS)に入社。1996年に自らメディア会社を設立。2011年からLGSと共に多様なコンサルティングを行いながら、異文化間における営業やマーケティングを行うためのコンサルティング会社を共同経営。企業経営、異文化間ビジネスとマーケティング、プロジェクト・マネージメントについての豊富な経験を有する。日本語能力検定1級。

このコラムニストの記事一覧に戻る

コラムトップに戻る