株式会社リンググローバルソリューション

グループサイト

文字サイズ

  • 小
  • 中
  • 大
  • お問い合わせ
  • TEL:03-6779-9420
  • JAPANESE
  • ENGLISH

COLUMN コラム

2016.12.27

Why Repatriation Matters (Part Four)

ガレス・モンティース

It is clear that returning expatriates (in other words, repatriates) have much to offer their companies in terms of knowhow and networks. Therefore, I asked at the end of my last article what companies could do to benefit further from what and who their repatriates know. Let’s examine that question now.

I found in my own research that Japanese companies, or at least the ones I glimpsed secondhand through the eyes of their repatriates, could do better. Michael Stevens and his research colleagues wrote in 2006 (see page 832) about the “strong tendency of firms to neglect repatriates upon their return from overseas assignments.” There is certainly a lot of energy directed towards expatriates, including pre-departure training, post-arrival interviews, and regular reviews while abroad. There is much less attention paid to repatriates, however. If this is the case, it is no surprise that people exhibit adjustment problems, disaffection, and disengagement after returning to Japan, sometimes resulting in employee turnover.

Retention is an issue, although perhaps more so in North America and Europe than in Japan. One of the participants in my study left her job two-and-a-half years after repatriating to take up a managerial position at a non-Japanese firm in the same industry. The other people, though, stayed where they were, and a further one-and-a-half years after I had concluded my study, they are still in those jobs. My sample size was small, so we should not draw specific conclusions from my qualitative research. Nonetheless, it seems to me significant that the person who did leave her job reported a lot of emotional conflict. When she handed in her resignation, a senior manager told her that he was shocked and disappointed as he really valued her work and felt that she made a big contribution to domestic and overseas colleagues. If only he had told her this before she tendered her resignation.

What Companies Might Do

This leads me to what I think companies might do better. The first is to talk with each repatriate in a Low Context way about the valuable skills, knowledge, and networks that they bring to the organisation. This should be done not only by her boss, but also by a senior manager. It should happen within three months of repatriation, and there should be follow-up discussions within a further year.

Another suggestion is to ask repatriates to give presentations and join meetings when they have knowledge of the countries and colleagues connected to specific tasks or projects. This can be done across sections, departments, and functions. For at least one year after returning, the repatriates have valuable and unique knowledge. They can keep their information current by joining meetings or dinners involving overseas colleagues who are visiting Japan. Not only would this help them to update their knowledge and networks, it would likely also make the visiting colleagues feel more relaxed.

In addition, repatriates could be consulted when a Japan-based colleague is about to go overseas to visit a local group company, supplier, or client. The repatriates almost certainly have information that would be useful. The same is true when overseas colleagues known to the repatriate are about to visit an office or factory in Japan, so they should be encouraged to ask for some advice. I found that in many cases, this was already happening because overseas colleagues took the initiative.

The final suggestion is to form a loose network of repatriates in Japan by organising lunch and dinner events so that they can provide support for one another. Repatriates often comment that they cannot talk about their overseas experience because domestic colleagues have no frame of reference and show no interest. Therefore, companies should help by creating networks. The cost would be low (food and drink), while the benefit would be large (increased motivation and greater knowledge sharing).

These are simple ideas, but it is difficult to find any company that employs them. Perhaps one reason is that the people making HR and management policies may not have lived overseas, and so they do not understand the value of the above. Another reason may be that repatriates work so hard to fit in back in Japan by not making any waves, with the result that they ignore their potential contribution.

So much for what companies can do to help repatriates. Next time, we will look at how repatriates might help their companies even more by supporting the process of localisation, both of management and of products and services.

2016.12.27

帰任者が何故重要なのか (パート4)

ガレス・モンティース

知識やネットワークという意味で、帰国した海外赴任者(あるいは帰任者)が会社に貢献できることがたくさんあることは明らかです。帰任者が知っていることや知っている人をより活用するために会社は何ができるのか、と前回のコラムの最後で私が問いかけたのはそのためです。では、この疑問について検討してみましょう。

私自身の研究から、日本企業、あるいは少なくとも帰任者の目を通して私が第三者的に垣間見た企業には、まだまだ改善の余地があることがわかりました。マイケル・スティーブンスと彼の研究チームは、2006年の論文(832ページ参照)に、「海外赴任からの帰国時に、企業は帰任者を放置するという強い傾向がある」と書いています。赴任前研修や赴任後面談、そして赴任中の定期的レビューなど、海外赴任者には確かに多くのエネルギーが向けられます。しかし、帰任者に向けられる注意はそれよりもかなり少ないものです。もしこれが本当なら、帰国後に適応障害や不満、脱落感を示す人が現れ、時には離職に終わってしまうことも驚くにはあたりません。

離職は問題ですが、日本よりも北米や欧州の方がより深刻だと思われます。私の研究に参加してくれた一人の女性は、帰任後2年半で、同業種の非日本企業に管理職として転職しました。一方、他の人たちは同じ会社に居続け、私が研究を完結した1年半後もまだ同じ仕事をしていました。私の研究の対象者数は少なかったため、この定性的研究から特定の結論を導き出すべきではありません。とはいえ、転職したその女性が話してくれた一連の感情的葛藤には深い意味があると私には思えます。彼女が辞表を提出した時、シニアマネージャーは、今まで彼女の仕事を高く評価し、また彼女の存在が国内外の社員に対し大きく貢献していると感じていただけにショックを受け、がっかりしたと話したそうです。彼女が辞表を出す前にそのことを彼女に話していれば、結果は変わっていたかもしれません。

会社は何ができるか

これを基に、改善するために会社は何ができるかを考えました。まずは、帰任者らが組織に提供する貴重なスキルや知識、ネットワークについて、帰任者一人一人と低コンテクストな方法で話すことです。これは帰任者の直属の上司だけでなく、シニアマネージャーによっても行われるべきです。帰任後3か月以内に行い、その1年以内にフォローアップディスカッションを行います。

もうひとつの提案は、特定のタスクやプロジェクトに関連する国や同僚を知っている帰任者に、プレゼンテーションをしてもらったり会議に参加してもらったりするのです。これは部署や職務に関係なく行うことができます。帰国後少なくとも1年間は帰任者は貴重で固有の知識を持っています。訪日中の海外からの同僚が関わっているミーティングやディナーに参加することで、帰任者は自分の情報を最新のものに更新し続けることができます。これは彼ら自身の知識やネットワークを更新しやすくするだけでなく、訪日中の同僚の居心地をよくするのにも役立つことでしょう。

また、日本を拠点とする同僚が海外の現地系列会社やサプライヤー、または顧客を訪ねる際、事前に帰任者に相談することもできます。帰任者らはほぼ確実に役立つ情報を持っています。同じことが帰任者を知っている海外の同僚が日本のオフィスや工場を訪ねる際にも当てはまるため、彼らは帰任者にアドバイスを求めるよう奨励されるべきです。多くの場合、海外の同僚らは率先して行動に移すため、これは既に行われていることがわかりました。

最後の提案は、ランチやディナーイベントを通して、日本にいる帰任者らがお互いに助け合えるよう、緩やかなネットワークを作ることです。自分たちの海外経験について話すことができない、なぜなら日本国内の同僚たちはその視点を持たず関心を示さないからだ、と帰任者はよく言います。そのため、企業がネットワークを作ることで支援するべきです。低コスト(飲食代のみ)の割に、得るもの(意欲向上、共有知識の増加)は大きいことでしょう。

これらは簡単なアイデアですが、採用している会社を見つけることは困難です。おそらく、その理由の一つは人事・経営方針を策定する人々が海外に居住したことがないからかもしれません。そのため、上述の価値を理解していないのです。もう一つの理由は、帰任者らが波風を立てずに日本にもう一度馴染もうと頑張るあまりに、自分たちの潜在的貢献の可能性を無視してしまうのかもしれません。

会社が帰任者らの支援のためにできることはたくさんあるのです。次回は、経営および製品・サービスのそれぞれのローカライゼーション工程の支援により、帰任者らがいかに会社に対しより貢献できるかについて見ていきます。
一色 顕

ガレス・モンティース

Gareth Monteath

PROFILE
ケンブリッジ大学 経営学修士(MBA:最優秀論文賞)。シェフィールド大学 中国学修士(MSc)。2016年、マンチェスター大学にて、経営学博士課程(DBA)を修了し博士号を取得。ロンドンのダイワ・ヨーロッパに勤務後、1991年にJET プログラムで来日以来、20年超の日本在住、勤務経験を誇る。1994年に前身の株式会社インテック・ジャパン現・株式会社インテックに入社。現在は株式会社リンクグローバルソリューションの執行役員の立場で、プログラムディレクターとして研修の企画・立案、および外国人講師の育成を担う。自らも日・英両言語を操りトップインストラクター、ファシリテーターとして年間100日以上登壇。ジェトロ主催のビジネス日本語能力テスト1級。著書「WIN-WIN 交渉術」(共著、清流出版)など。

このコラムニストの記事一覧に戻る

コラムトップに戻る